7 Steps To Take Before Submitting Your Manuscript To An Editor


Great advice. Thanks for sharing Nicholas. 🙂

Nicholas C. Rossis

I don’t often have the pleasure of hosting guest posts by editors, so I am particularly pleased with this one. Liam Carnahan looks at editing from the editor’s point of view, explaining what you need to do before you submit your manuscript to an editor. Liam is the founder and chief editor at Invisible Ink Editing. The team at Invisible Ink work with independent authors to help them prepare their manuscripts for submissions or publication. You can follow them on Facebook or Twitter.

7 Steps To Take Before Submitting Your Manuscript To An Editor

Book editing | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book Image: Pexels

The self-editing process can be long and painful, and it’s often hard to know when you’re actually done fiddling with a draft. At some point, you have to stop yourself from making changes and submit to an editor.

Before you do that, there are some quick and easy steps you can take…

View original post 712 more words

4 Resources for Understanding #GDPR for Authors


Make sure you are up to date…GDPR comes into law today

The PBS Blog

rawpixel-651365-unsplash

So far I have provided four different resources for understanding GDPR. Again, the general understanding is that you don’t have to send out re-confirmations to your list as long as you’ve been obtaining emails legally in the first place. Just make sure your opt-in forms and privacy policies are clear and transparent. Derek Murphy’s article talks about GDPR as it relates to using email marketing for list building and giveaways. Check it out below (it’s #4).

Important Notice: – The #GDPR in Effect May 25, 2018 Is Your Blog Ready?GDPR And Authors: What You Need To Know

SPF-117: GDPR – What All Authors Need to Know – with Gemma Gibbs

*GDPR regulations for writers using listbuilding giveaways like KingSumo

Note: Don’t forget about your websites!  If you have an author website outside the blog be sure that’s GDPR compliant as well. 

View original post

Everything You Learn Each Time Your Writing Gets Rejected


Always remember a rejection is a new learning curve… When you FAIL it is your First Attempt In Learning 🙂

Novelty Revisions

We’ve talked about rejection a lot on this blog this year. The more I write about writing, the more I get to interact with fellow writers — and the more in-tune I become with the things you’re all struggling with — like rejection, and self-doubt.

That’s what I love most about running Novelty Revisions. I’m constantly learning right along with you. A good writer is on a continuous quest to learn as she grows.

The best way to learn anything, as a writer, is to pay attention to what’s going on around you as you’re in the midst of the action.

Which is why I don’t think we need to be as afraid of getting rejected as we often are.

Like it or not, each no or lack of response teaches you something new about the process … or reinforces something you still need to learn.

Here’s everything even one…

View original post 532 more words

Helping Senior Citizens Self-Publish – by Joel Friedlander…


As a publisher my first four clients were senior citizens… It was great working with them

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on The Book Designer:

Although the indie publishing world sometimes seems to be populated by young entrepreneurial authors, in fact a lot of writers publishing books today are at the other end of the spectrum—senior citizens.

It may be hard to pin down what exactly we mean by “older authors,” but I generally take it to mean people 50 years of age and over who haven’t published their own books before.

And this is a particularly good age for anyone who has dreamt of writing a book to actually do so. And there’s never been a better time for these people to publish, either.

Find out more HERE

View original post

To trope or not to trope…when writing become a clichĂ©! #writing #amwriting


To Trope or NOT…

G.L. Cromarty

Today I want to talk about tropes. When to use them, when not to use them, and the vast gray quagmire that exists between.

What is a literary trope?

In the literary sense, a trope is a common theme, plot point, event or motif within a story.

What is the problem with using a trope?

There is nothing wrong with using a common trope, there are oodles of them out there and we love them, which I will explore in more detail below. The problem is only when they are overused…badly.

They make us groan, switch off, or even reach for the nearest trashcan to dispense of the literary waste.

Overused tropes and writing clichés are boring, disappointing, and leave the reader feeling cheated.

So, we should never use a trope?

Here is where it starts to get a little gray and fuzzy. It’s pretty difficult to think of something completely…

View original post 481 more words

60 Great US Writing Conferences in June 2018 – by Erica Verrillo…


Writing Conferences anyone?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

June is bustin’ out all over for writers.

There are no fewer than 60 writing conferences this month, stretching from coast to coast, and covering every aspect of writing and publishing.

Want to pitch your work to an agent? There are six conferences in New York, California and points in between that will be attended by agents eager to hear your pitch.

Workshops, manuscript consultations, readings, book signings, panel discussions, and contests abound.

There is something for everyone.

See details of them all HERE

View original post

5 Basic Things You Learn After Starting To Write Full-Time


Learning is the way you’ll grow. Keep going, you’ll do great 🙂

Allie Potts Writes

5 Basic Things You Learn After Starting to Write Full-Time - www.alliepottswrites.comI haven’t been in my new position as a full-time writer long, but I am already learning a number of things about the process, especially as to how it pertains to online media – like how bad I am at it on this site (in terms of monetization, rapid audience building, or anything else you can think of when you try to come up with ways to actually making a living off writing outside of selling books, which is a whole story for another day), even when the writing itself was good.

For one, I don’t use nearly enough H2 tags in my blog posts, or headers for those not as versed in HTML lingo. Apparently, readers like to see big bold text so they know which words I spent hours upon hours tirelessly crafting are okay for their eyes to totally skip over.

That being said:

Be bold

Readers…

View original post 317 more words