Tag Archives: Cac the Proofreader

Word War with Cac the Proofreader – Allusion, Illusion & Elusion

word-war
Here we go again! It’s WORD WAR time! Today I’m bringing you something that is extremely confusing to so many: ALLUSION vs. ILLUSION vs. ELUSION. Let’s get to work.
ALLUSION: figure of speech describing something, either direct or implied, often a comparison.
Example: “He’s such a Romeo.” The reference to Shakespeare’s Romeo implies he’s very romantic.
ILLUSION: refers to a deceptive appearance or impression, a false idea or belief. It tricks the brain into thinking something that isn’t there, is. unreal into a real.
Example: “David Copperfield’s sudden appearance of a Cadillac on his stage is just an illusion.”
ELUSION: describes the act of hiding from or avoiding.
Example: “Elusion of these words is easy as long as you remember their meanings and uses”
Feel free to send me your WORD WAR! I’d love to share it right here for all to enjoy!
For your proofreading needs (and soon to be copyediting!), I am easily reached via the below:
833.I.PROOF.U/833.477.6638

Word War with Cac the Proofreader – FEWER/LESS

Cac The Proofreader back with another WORD WAR! Today, LESS versus FEWER is on tap. And it can be quite tricky.
 
LESS basically means not as much and is used when you cannot count the items you’re referring to; in other words, if it’s a singular “mass” noun. Ask yourself if the noun in your intended sentence will be working with a countable or uncountable noun. Examples are: water, space, love. “I’ve been drinking less water than I used to.” Not an item you can count. “There’s less space in this closet.” Again, uncountable.
 
FEWER means not as many and is your choice when the noun IS countable. Example: “As my dog ages, she has fewer accidents.” “I make fewer grammatical mistakes since my training.” Both of these are countable noun items.
 
A great example for incorporating both words is: “If fewer people used disposable water bottles, there would be less plastic in landfills.” Countable and uncountable, respectively.
 
BIG TIP: A good way to test that a noun is truly uncountable is to try making a plural out of it, i.e., “I’d like fewer milks, please.” Doesn’t make sense, does it? Milk is not countable.
 
I hope you learned something today and that these make for smoother, stay-in-the-zone writing!
 
Send me your WORD WAR. I’d love to dissect it for all the world to benefit from.

My contact information is as follows:

833.I.PROOF.U/833.477.6638 HAPPY WRITING!

Word War with Cac the Proofreader

 
 
It’s WORD WAR time! Let’s examine apostrophes, as they seem to be very widely misused and abused! Apostrophes are primarily used for three things: Let’s go…easy to more complex.
 
1) Contractions. Apostrophes replace omitted letters. In the phrase “They’re back,” the apostrophe replaces the “a” in the omitted word “are.” “Don’t do that.” The apostrophe replaces the “o” in the omitted word “not.”
 
2) To show possession of a noun. “That is the dog’s collar.” The collar belongs to the dog.
 
3) To form an “awkward” plural. “There are two m’s and two c’s in accommodation.” Without that tiny punctuation mark, ease of readability goes down and the sentence misunderstood.
 
Lastly, and super confusing for folks, is the use of the apostrophe when forming possession with a proper noun ending in “s.” Then it breaks down even further depending on whether that noun is singular or plural.
 
Examples: “That looks like James’s car”: singular noun here. However, what if James was the last name of the people living under the same roof? It would read: “The dinner was at the James’ home.”
 
This conversation gets deeper and a bit more complex. Feel free to reach out if you’d like more details and examples. For now, we will leave it right here!
 
I’m Cac The Proofreader. I would LOVE to dissect your WORD WAR, and perhaps even proofread your next project! Visit my site for more information: cactheproofreader.com.
Direct line: 833.I.PROOF.U/833.477.6638

Word War with Cac the Proofreader

It’s WORD WAR time! I’m Cac The Proofreader, and today I’m serving up ME, MYSELF AND I, another one I see consistently misused.

I am going to simplify this for you so your confusion will be a thing of the past!

ME and I. “Between you and I” is incorrect because the word “I” cannot be the object of a preposition (between). Even though the former sounds more scholarly, it is wrong. “That is a gift from my wife and I.” The phrase “my wife and I” cannot be the object of a preposition (from); therefore, the sentence needs rephrasing. The new and correct structure should read, “That is a gift from me and my wife. “Contact either me or your manager” is an example of a sentence that most people think is grammatically incorrect (as opposed to “myself”), but in fact it complies with grammar rules.

MYSELF.

You can only use MYSELF if you’ve used the word “I” in the sentence. Example: “I made it myself.” Do not use “myself” because you think it sounds more formal or polite, as in “Send any complaints to the manager or myself.” The correct usage is “…to the manager or me.”

In summary, and quick tips: * “MYSELF” must always have the word “I” in the sentence. * “I” cannot be the direct object of a verb. And there you have it! EZ PZ, right?

If you’d like me to dissect one of your WORD WARS, drop it below, email me at cac@cactheproofreader.com, or just pick up the phone: 833.I.PROOF.U/833.477.6638.

Lastly, If you have a writing project in need of proofreading, please let me know. You’ll find my information on my website: cactheproofreader.com. HAPPY WRITING!

Word War with Cac the Proofreader

Cac The Proofreader back with another WORD WAR, and this one’s a double dose of fun! We’re going to look at two words, each of which has two spellings and different meanings. So I should say we’re looking at four words! Let’s dive in…
 
ALTOGETHER vs. ALL TOGETHER.
 
ALTOGETHER means “completely,” “in total,” even “all in all.” Example: “Altogether, I spent a thousand dollars.”
 
ALL TOGETHER means everyone or everything together, as “in one.” Example: “Put the dogs all together in one pen.”
A tip: If you can separate the words “all” and “together” and the sentence makes sense, that’s your cue that it takes the two-word version. Example: “Put all the dogs together in one pen.”
 
And for the other set, I’ll be short and sweet!
 
ALRIGHT vs. ALL RIGHT.
 
ALRIGHT is really not a word, no matter the circumstance…in both American and British English. Sure, you will run across it in books, manuscripts, and informal writings, but in the education and editorial world, it is not acceptable. Moral of that story…JUST. SAY. NO!
 
ALL RIGHT. Always use this form and you’ll never be wrong. The one-word version may make its mark over time and be considered acceptable, but it isn’t just yet. So until that day comes, stick with ALL RIGHT!
 
And there you have it! Just in case you have trouble deciding which way to go, be sure to use the tip I gave you earlier; that will always set you on the right track.
 
If you’d like for me to pick apart one of your WORD WARS, feel free to drop it below, email me at cac@cactheproofreader.com, or just pick up the phone: 833.I.PROOF.U/833.477.6638.
 
Lastly, If you have a writing project I can support you with, please let me know. You’ll find my information on my website: cactheproofreader.com